ZERO HERO

Zero Hero is a proposal for a student residence that produces as much power as it uses. To do this, the bulk of the project is wrapped in a skin of glass louvres, embedded with PV cells, that temper the air inside the building while producing electricity. At its heart, a large central atrium removes excess heat from the interior, while providing a dramatic gathering place for students, faculty and staff.

100 MILE HOUSE

The challenge of this competition was to design a house, in Vancouver, that could be built using materials sourced from within a 100-mile radius of the site. Our proposal was to go even further: We discovered that a house could be built almost entirely of recycled waste materials collected from sources within 100-miles of Vancouver. This proposal won first prize in the 100 Mile House competition.

VANCOUVER MAT

What if the new Vancouver Art Gallery were built on a site that radically redefines the urban fabric of Vancouver? In this proposal, the gallery spans Granville Street – Vancouver’s most important axial street, and the entry point to downtown. A new, linear sculpture park on the bridge offers a generous outdoor connection to the gallery, whose entire roof would be Vancouver’s largest public plaza. A gallery in this location would instantly become the city’s “welcome mat.”

DAVIE KNOLL

Davie Knoll is an attempt to capture the experiences of a grassy hill in a busy urban setting. Like a knoll in nature, every seating position offers a slightly different experience. Some spots feel more sheltered, some more open; some intimate, others public; some sunny, others shaded; and each spot offers a slightly different view. Plus, the parklet is covered entirely in a material made of 80% recycled tires.

POINT GREY RESIDENCE

This home was designed to take advantage of beautiful ocean and mountain views to the northeast by providing generous walls of glass and a rooftop patio at this corner of the plan. The steeply-sloping site allows the living room to be lifted to enjoy the view, while maintaining a direct connection with the yard at the rear.

This project was designed in collaboration with Shelter Residential Design.

POINT GREY RESIDENCE

This home was designed to take advantage of beautiful ocean and mountain views to the northeast by providing generous walls of glass and a rooftop patio at this corner of the plan. The steeply-sloping site allows the living room to be lifted to enjoy the view, while maintaining a direct connection with the yard at the rear.

This project was designed in collaboration with Shelter Residential Design.

DAVIE KNOLL

Davie Knoll is an attempt to capture the experiences of a grassy hill in a busy urban setting. Like a knoll in nature, every seating position offers a slightly different experience. Some spots feel more sheltered, some more open; some intimate, others public; some sunny, others shaded; and each spot offers a slightly different view. Plus, the parklet is covered entirely in a material made of 80% recycled tires.

VANCOUVER MAT

What if the new Vancouver Art Gallery were built on a site that radically redefines the urban fabric of Vancouver? In this proposal, the gallery spans Granville Street – Vancouver’s most important axial street, and the entry point to downtown. A new, linear sculpture park on the bridge offers a generous outdoor connection to the gallery, whose entire roof would be Vancouver’s largest public plaza. A gallery in this location would instantly become the city’s “welcome mat.”

100 MILE HOUSE

The challenge of this competition was to design a house, in Vancouver, that could be built using materials sourced from within a 100-mile radius of the site. Our proposal was to go even further: We discovered that a house could be built almost entirely of recycled waste materials collected from sources within 100-miles of Vancouver. This proposal won first prize in the 100 Mile House competition.

ZERO HERO

Zero Hero is a proposal for a student residence that produces as much power as it uses. To do this, the bulk of the project is wrapped in a skin of glass louvres, embedded with PV cells, that temper the air inside the building while producing electricity. At its heart, a large central atrium removes excess heat from the interior, while providing a dramatic gathering place for students, faculty and staff.